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Workshops

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Photo Credit: Skye Fort

Sowing Seeds of Community

In her book “Emergent Strategy,” adrienne maree brown writes: “What we pay attention to grows.” Through guided art-making and storytelling, participants reflect on a community that they want to invest more deeply in and plant the seeds for intentional relationship building. Workshops range from one to three hours.

 

What it includes:

  • 3 one-on-one meetings: initial brainstorming, menu/workshop development, post-workshop reflection

  • Workshop materials

  • Workshop facilitation

 

Story Seeds workshops range from $275-$350, depending on the length of engagement. Price includes prep time and cost of materials.

 

If you don’t have a location to host the workshop, I can work with you to find an appropriate gathering space. 

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Community Tastes Like...

In these storytelling workshops, food facilitates the conversation. I’ll work with you to design a menu based on your chosen theme, prepare the menu, and facilitate the Story Circles. Gatherings are two hours long and include a meal. 

 

What it includes: 

  • 3 one-on-one meetings: initial brainstorming, menu/workshop development, post-workshop reflection

  • Menu designed around the chosen theme

  • Meal

  • Workshop facilitation 

 

All dinner workshops begin at a flat rate of $300, which includes prep time and meetings. Final pricing is determined by the cost of ingredients and food preparation labor.

 

If you don’t have a location to host the workshop, I can work with you to find an appropriate gathering space.

What are
Story
Circles?

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“It’s a heap of good meaning to be found in a story if you got a mind to hear."
~Junebug Jabbo Jones

Photo Credit: Christy Zuccarini

Story Circles were developed by John O’Neal, founder of the Free Southern Theater and Junebug Productions, as both a way of facilitating audience talkback sessions and developing script material for community-based plays. This methodology has been influential for other community-based theater groups as a way of engaging the community in their creative process and building relationships amongst ensemble members.

 

In the circle, everyone takes turns sharing their story, uninterrupted.

 

Listening to each other's stories is equally important.

 

As O'Neal said: “In story telling, listening is always more important than talking. If you’re thinking about your story while someone else is telling theirs, you won’t hear what they say. If you trust the circle, when it comes your turn to tell, a story will be there.”

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